Better translation for Volks Yukinojo's story?

May 11, 2006

    1. Hey guys!

      Can anyone speak enough japanese that they could translate out yukinojo's story...? The one on the Volks english site is kinda well... "engrishy". :blush
       
    2. I'd love to know this too.

      Aimee, I thought you were selling yours though. I'm curious, do you want it for your magazine column or book or something? Is there some cool Yuki feature coming along? :-D
       
    3. I'm working on it, but it will be a while. My friend and I are in the process of getting the syntax and some kanji straight.

      -Kat
       
    4. thanks that would be awesome!

      I really love reading the stories for each of the dolls and it really bothers me that his is almost unreadable! :(
       
    5. Jun's is much, much worse...*_*
       
    6. (Most of ) We Japanese can't understand his story well :sweat
      That' a little strange :sweat

      When Yukinojo Sawaragi was 10 years old, he lost her mother.
      Her last words were "Your father was a Russian soldier."

      He bacame alone...he swore to survive.

      Six year later...now he has parents in law...
      They are fighters and Yukinojo lives as a fighter, too.
      They travel worldwide...Yukinojo has looked up the stars alone sometimes in a journey of the North and sometimes in the shore of the South.

      Once, he saw hell at the big stage in Los Angels.
      His father was bleeding like hell.

      But wherever he goes, he has friends. Tokyo, Yokohama, and Los Angels.
      .......

      Can you understand~?? :whee:
      I'm sorry my English is poor...
       
    7. I tot the Volks website has the translation? It sounds okay to me though.

      Anyways, here's the extract of it. Hope it helps

      - Story -

      "Your father was a Russian soldier."

      That is the last words to her ten years old son, Yukinojo Sawaragi and it is also a signal of long journey of a boy, “Yukinojo”.

      "I will survive, father and mother.I will."

      The shout from his heart never faded away in the snow field.

      Six year latter, he spends day as a quiet son of a family of fighter.

      He has looked up the stars alone sometimes in a journey of the North and sometimes in the shore of the South.

      Sometimes he saw hell at the big stage in Los Angels while he was clinging to his father who was bleeding like a hell.

      Wherever he goes, he has friends. Tokyo, Yokohama, and Los Angels.

      He is a boy of a sad fate who has to be stronger than anyone else and can not stop giving love to anyone.

      The fourth boy of “Songs of the Boys - Tokyo Boys Story”, Yukinojo Sawaragi, is coming into your life at last.
       
    8. what I dont quite understand is the "sometimes he saw hell" part. are they trying to say his father died on a stage in LA? so is his mother Japanese, and his father Russian then...?
       
    9. His father died in a mosh pit? :-p Hahaha.

      Seriously, though, I wonder what that stage is supposed to be.
       
    10. Aimee:blush
      Yukinojo's honest father is Russian and mother is Japanese, but both of them died in his youth. His present father isn't a honest father. And they are traveling as fighters and sometimes battle on the stage. Volks want to say Yukinojo's father has been closed to death by battle once. Now is it OK?
       
    11. So Yukinojo does like...pro wresling or prize fighting/boxing on stage?
       
    12. Or maybe like those illegal fighting matches you hear about.
       
    13. How un-doll like.

      But I guess that's why he's got those muscles.
       
    14. Reminds me of something sort of Fight Club-ish, even though I haven't seen the movie.

      Also, my interpretation of Yukinojo's story:

      “Your father was a Russian soldier."

      These were the last words to her ten years old son, Yukinojo Sawaragi. They were the beginning of a long journey the boy, “Yukinojo” would make.
      Yuu Note: Sounds like he grew up with just his mother and never knew his real dad.

      "I will survive, father and mother. I will."
      The promise from his heart never faded away in the snow field.
      Yuu Note: I assume ‘snow field’ has to do with the cold, empty, world he was left to grow up in by himself.

      Six years later, he spends his days as the quiet son of a family. They are fighters and Yukinojo now lives as a fighter too.
      They travel worldwide and Yukinojo has looked up at the stars, alone, from the North and from the shores of the South.

      One time, he saw “hell incarnated on earth” at the big stage in Los Angeles, while he was clinging to his father, who was bleeding like hell.
      Yuu Note: I’m assuming he saw a very traumatizing event here. It seems to me that his adopted father was mortally wounded and Yukinojo got very spooked but could only cling to him helplessly as the terrible event carried on.

      Wherever he goes, he has friends: Tokyo, Yokohama, and Los Angeles.

      He has a sad fate and [because of this] has had to be stronger than anyone else [for those he cares about] and can not stop giving love to anyone.

      The fourth boy of “Songs of the Boys - Tokyo Boys Story”, Yukinojo Sawaragi, is coming into your life at last.
       
    15. I always wondered about that stage part. :/
      Perhaps stage could refer to that stage in his life, IE, being in LA and seeing hs father wounded?
       
    16. Hi Rivers...^^

      Sometimes a battle ground is thought of as, or refered to as a "stage."
      (The Pacific stage was the area where General Patton never fought.) So maybe that's what they mean...?? Maybe?
       

    17. Oh, that does make sense! The Pacific "theater"--of course. Duh, I should have thought of that myself. :roll:

      I can stop beating my head against that particular word now! What a relief . . . ;)
       
    18. so,... was he fighting with his adopted father and wounded him...?

      or do they fight other people together?

      *confused*
       
    19. Aimee - It could be just me, but I think they were fighting other people together.
      Then again, I'm not quite sure. >_>
      *goes off to think about something else and rid herself of confusion*
       
    20. Found it. It makes a bit more sense in Japanese, but is still really vague about what the Los Angeles stage is. >_> Here's my translation:

      "Your father was a Russian soldier."

      These were the last words spoken by his mother to Sawaragi Yukinojo when he was ten years old.

      Those words were the signal for the endlessly continuing "Yukijojo"'s journey (to begin).

      "Father, mother, I'll show you that I will absolutely survive."

      The boy's exclamation echoed endlessly across the stark white snow plane.

      Six years later. He spends his days as a shy, quiet member of a martial arts family, who have become his parents.

      Traveling once without a path, once to the sandy shores of the south, he gazed up at the stars alone.

      And once, he envisioned the hell that was his father, covered in blood at the grand stage in Los Angeles.

      Wherever Yukinojo went, friendship blossomed. Tokyo, Yokohama, and Los Angeles.

      The boy who has yet to obtain strength is the destined hero, he who cannot help but love others.

      The last of the Tokyo Boys, Sawaragi Yukinojo, at last arrives at your door.


      So basically, not much different from what everyone else is. The problem is that it's written in really ornate, formal Japanese, some of which is straight classical language out of the Heian period. (I studied classical Japanese two years ago, but I've forgotten what it all means - I can still recognize it as old, but it's like old English. The words and letters are there, but they make no sense. @_@) I doubt even native Japanese speakers would be able to comprehend what on earth that thing is talking about.

      My interpretation is that Yukinojo's father was somehow involved a bit deeper in the Russian army than any normal soldier should have been, and Yukinojo was there at some sort of final showdown/conflict in Los Angeles, where he saw his father bleed to death at the scene of the action, which he saw as his own personal hell. (Not literally a large stage - more like a setting. I don't know why they use the word "stage" here - probably to be poetic and ornate, as usual. Maybe something was on fire, too? XD) But he didn't understand why that happened until his mother said with her dying breath that Yukinojo's father was a Russian soldier. (How that explains anything to the poor kid, I don't know.) He vows to survive, and goes to live a quiet life with a family of martial artists, spending his days simply being there, after traveling around and spending much time staring up at the stars alone. However, he loves everyone, and has friends everywhere - or at least, in the three places he seems to only ever have traveled.

      The story is really disjointed and vague and makes no sense in any language. It would be nice if Volks would put out a longer, more detailed, understandable version in normal Japanese, because it's certainly interesting.

      And no wonder Yukinojo is so hot - he's half-Russian. @_@ *drool*

      I'm sure everything I wrote has already been said, but I just had to take a crack at it. ^_^; (Because why do homework when I can look at pretty dolls? Indeed. ^_^)

      P.S. Thanks usagi665 for linkage!! <3