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Do you think you admire complex posing of a doll?

Feb 20, 2012

    1. After looking at some images of two dolls kissing, although the image was beautiful, what struck me is the posing and how much time and effort must have gone to pose the dolls together so perfectly.

      The questions I propose are these:
      Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?
      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?
      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?
       
    2. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?
      Of course. That's all part of the composition. If a doll's head is cricked in a horrible way, or the hands are twisted round, or the arm is too far behind its back, the picture will look awful even if it has a lovely setting, lighting etc. In fact I can't look at picture where dolls are posed really unnaturally because I think "ouch!"
      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?
      It depends on the doll. Some dolls, like Delfs, are easy to pose naturally. Others are more difficult to manipulate into shape. For me it's not so much about how complex the pose is, it's about how natural and human it looks.
      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?
      I don't know, really. It's still possible to admire a lovely natural pose of course, no matter whether or not you have a doll of your own. But it may look easier than it is. Some dolls are very difficult to pose!
       
    3. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      YEs i really like that side of the dolls, intact thats what i looking for in my doll

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?

      I hope to find out soon the pros and cons in posing

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?

      I think i works both ways as i was not into Dolls to start with but saw sum really cool pics and was " hey i can do that and started me off "

      I just need to get the right doll lol
       
    4. I appreciate what others can do.;)
      I, however, don't try to much posing yet.
      Shell
       
    5. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      I might not notice the more subtle intricate poses right off the bat, but yes I do tend to consider it when viewing doll photographs.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?

      Oh yes! As a BJD owner, I know first hand how hard it can be to get these dolls to cooperate. I can't tell you how many times I have thought I got the pose down perfectly, only to get an arm or leg lashing out at me.

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?

      Haha, yes! My girlfriend is a perfect example! When I got my first doll, she was watching me pose him for some photos and I was getting frustrated with how his left leg kept popping up on me. She laughed at me until I told her to try it; after he did the same thing to her, she had a totally new respect for posing these hunks of resin! ;] As for non-doll owners not being able to admire a well posed doll, I don't really think so. I think most people when admiring a picture of a posed object do take notice of the pose at some point.
       
    6. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      All the time - especially w/the dolls.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?

      The more I try to get my own dolls to pose, the more admiration I have for those who get them into perfect, natural poses!

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?

      I think that they might not appreciate the difficulty aspects LOL Same w/anything - being a beledi dancer, there are girls who make a GREAT living learning, like, 5 or 10 easy moves & going w/it - but of course a trained dancer knows....
      Same w/posing these dolls - there are simple poses that look great for showing your family & friends what your babies look like, then there are the pics (or photo stories) where you are struggling to get them to do things they NEED to do to tell the story!!!!
       
    7. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      Most definitely. I really admire a photographer who is able to make a doll seem realistic in its poses.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?

      Like Harlequin-Elle pointed out, some dolls are harder to pose than others, and you would know that by experience or from people talking about it. Before I owned BJDs, I admired their realism, however after owning one I can say I admire it even more.

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?

      Not necessarily. If you understand the mechanics behind BJDs, I believe that someone could have a pretty good idea about posing aspects. I don't own every doll, or have experience with each one, but can appreciate realistic posing in all BJD types.
       
    8. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures? Absolutely! I know that some dolls pose well right out of the box, while others require a lot more work. With sueding and restringing, I consider all the hard work put into a dolls pose and ability to do so.

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? I do have an art degree, so I understand that art takes time, and getting the "subjects" right inside of the shot is part of the process. It's not like the dolls are real people who can move a certain direction to achieve a better shot. It's up to the owner or photographer to make things perfect. In my opinion, it's twice the work! :)

      With that said, I will be ordering my first bjd at the end of the month. I do have friends who own their own dollies, and I've seen firsthand how stubborn they can be in photo-shoots! I think it's rather cute (though very frustrating), when a doll is posed perfectly, and then their hand snaps to attention at the last second.;)
       
    9. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?
      Indeed. Bad posing and posture makes for bad pictures, in my opinion. I understand there is only so much you can do with certain dolls, but you can tell those pictures apart whose owners take more time to pose their dolls with more finess.
      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?
      I do not yet own a doll, but I don't think it hinders my appreciation for the picture in any aspect whatsoever. Just as you don't have to know about building a skyscraper to appreciate architecture or how to paint to appreciate art, you don't need to know the hardships of posing to appreciate the final product in this regard.
      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?
      Probably, as I have never felt the joys of posing an actual BJD, I would not know all the eccentricities of doing so, but, as I have stated above, it doesn't mean I'm able to not appreciate the photograph for what it is.
       
    10. I think that posing is a very important aspect of photography.

      I think that difficult poses, when pulled-off well and with good angle(s) on the subject, can really make a good photo look phenomenal. But, a situation which calls for a simple pose where a complex pose is used can simply look desperate or overdone.

      I think that knowing how hard it can be to string/pose a BJD can add to the admiration of a pose in a photo, but I think that people who do photography and/or modeling and/or simply have an artistic eye could admire it the same way without knowing BJDs.
       
    11. For me, a doll's posing is a very big aspect in my enjoyment of doll photography. Having dabbled a little in the photography aspect of the hobby, I know that the more natural and human poses don't always come naturally to the dolls. Especially if a pose is something more on the extreme side, like kneeling on one knee bowing over a sword. I can and have spent hours making sure a doll's pose is as natural and human as I can get it.

      While I think those who do not have dolls may not know exactly what goes in to putting a doll in some of the more amazing poses they can do, I think they can appreciate and enjoy doll photography every bit as much as the doll veterans who've been doing this for 10+ years. Sure, they may not appreciate or comprehend the work and effort going into that particular pose, but that doesn't make the picture or their enjoyment of it any less.
       
    12. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      Certainly. On the one hand, awkward or unrealistic poses will distract me from the rest of the content of a photo or set of photos; thus, a wonky pose in the middle of a photostory would jarr me out of the flow of whatever story is being told, sort of like breaking the temporary suspension of disbelief that takes place when I am being led to perceive the doll as a person/character rather than an inanimate object. On the flipside, if the poses in the photoset are very well-executed, then they would be so natural that I would be drawn easily through the progression of the photos and suggested motions, and only afterwards would I think to remove myself from the context of the images to contemplate the time and effort that it must have taken to achieve those poses in reality.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can appreciate the posing difficulty more and therefore are more able to admire the picture?

      Yes ... especially if the doll I see being posed skillfully is one that I own or have handled in the past. For example, my sister's DZ Floy is on the oldest version of the 60cm boy body, and is (sometimes endearingly, sometimes frustratingly) squeaky and single-jointed all over. So when I see another doll owner achieving a beautiful crouching or curled up pose with his/her Floy, especially if I recognize that it is also on the first generation body, my level of admiration for the work goes up another level. XD

      Do you think those without BJDs have less of an insight into the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And possibly are less able to admire it?

      I think that those who have not handled a BJD before might not fully comprehend all the time and wrestling and perspective tricks it takes to get that perfect picture, haha -- but as others have said, that doesn't mean they can't still appreciate the convincing realism and aesthetic appeal in a naturally executed pose and overall skillful photography. I sometimes show a batch of photos to friends outside the BJD hobby before I post the pictures, in order to have a fresh set of eyes to help me spot oddities in the background, photo-editing gaffs, etc. If a friend specifically tells me, "Oh, I really like photo #__, everything about it feels so real!" then that particular photo is most definitely going to be included in the final selection of pictures I choose to post. That kind of response tells me that the doll's pose as well as its relationship to its setting were sufficiently convincing to engage an outside viewer.
       
    13. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?

      -Depending on what exactly is going on in the picture, ye​s.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?

      -I would definantly think so on this. Since having done a few photo shoots myself, I can understand how difficult it can be at times just to get a doll to stand. >.<

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?

      -I can't be sure on having less insight, but I think anyone can admire great posing.
       
    14. Oh gosh, yes, I admire when dolls can pose wonderfully. There's something innately superb about a doll that can hold many natural poses, well, naturally.

      It isn't even them being able to hold "extreme" poses: Just seeing a photoshoot with a wide variety of really humanlike poses is great. :D
       
    15. Do you ever consider the posing side of photography when looking at pictures?&#8594;Aha yes. Of course it is all part of the picture in a BJD photo. Though sometimes it is overlooked that effort is actually put into posing.

      Do you think you, as a doll owner, can aprieciate the posing difficulty more and therefore more able to admire the picture?&#8594;Maybe. . . ? I also work with figures and take many photos of those, so I guess personally it might be from both of these hobbies, in my individual case anyway.

      Do you think those without BJD's have less of an insight to the posing aspect of the dolls in photography? And posibly less able to admire it?&#8594;Not necessarily; it just varies from person to person. I mean there are some people who probably won't even see much in BJDs themselves or eve realize the work that goes into a faceup so. Another maybe to this question. ^^;;;
       
    16. I consider posing ability to be essential to my extended enjoyment of photographing a doll. If a doll only looks well in a few simple poses, I get frustrated with it as a model and move on to another shoot. If a doll can seem lesson transition into many natural looking poses I will continue to photograph it for hours. I was a figure model for many years so I have a really good handle on what sort of poses actually translate well to 2D and look natural and comfortable. Nothing frustrates me more than to find that a doll sculptor hasn't really taken human engineering into account. Multiple double joint WTF doesn't really impress me when the end result makes the doll look like he's been run over in two places just by sitting down.