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Offended people by doll nudity??

Jul 16, 2016

    1. Every time I see the warnings like 'NSFW', 'doll nudity', etc, in the topic titles I wonder: why? I mean, it's a doll! How can people be offended by a naked DOLL?! The fact that your boss probably doesn't like you to browse doa in general, is somewhat obvious, but that has nothing to do with nudity....or dolls...or doa XD

      I know some countries have a different take on nudity, but I assume you don't check doa out in the open there, to avoid any risk.

      So my question is:

      Have you ever experienced offended people by (online) doll nudity?

      Obviously I haven't and since I check doa on my phone, I will probably be the one to be offended cause somebody peeked over my shoulder :')
       
    2. Well, they do accept people of all ages here on DoA and there are some dolls who are rather realistic in terms of anathomy, so I guess it is undertandable to put these tags on some topics.
       
    3. Agreed with LilaAIP. Some companies make extremely realistic sculpts, so it's kind of along the same lines of filtering out nudity on art sights. Some users are pretty young, and others just simply don't want to see that sort of thing. I personally censor my doll, even though he's not that realistic down under, simply because it's courteous to other users--and I also view my doll as an individual who deserves some privacy. XD
       
      #3 Little Lu, Jul 16, 2016
      Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
      • x 2
    4. Some people might not feel offended by it exactly but still be a bit uncomfortable at the sight of doll nudity because some of these are very detailed. Different people have different levels of tolerance to just about everything, after all. I think having a NSFW warning is a good way to be courteous to those people. Not to mention that while it is very annoying when people peek over our shoulders, that still doesn't keep it from happening. I personally appreciate the tags because if I know my family or other people are constantly passing behind me on their way to do other things they might only catch a glimpse of what I'm looking at and think it's an actual naked human being, which would lead to some awkward explanations. To us doll people it might seem silly but I know quite a few people outside the hobby that are annoyingly judgemental and if I can avoid involving them in this situation I sure will, haha.
       
      • x 1
    5. Well imagine this
      In my line of work I am allowed to browse for something to read during dead times. Imagine being on doa, Its fine everything is dandy and my boss rushed by behind as a scroll past a naked doll.

      • At first glance it might not even look like a doll
      • In the workplace you are not allowed to browse sexually themed things.

        But if someone put a NSFW tag I know I should check it later at home.
      The tag have saved me so so soooo many times.
      I dont think generally people are offended by it its a good way to give a heads up.
      Or for people wanting to especially look at these things to find them easier (this last part is not only for the nsfw tag)
       
      • x 2
    6. It's best to remember that NSFW only means "not safe for work". Most people do not feel it is appropriate to be caught looking at naked pictures, even of dolls or paintings of artistic nudes in the workplace for fear that a boss or co-worker, could get the wrong idea. Sometimes a person could be fired for such a thing, thus the internet etiquette of using the NSFW tag.
      On this forum there are plenty of users under the age of 18 and the aim is to maintain a wholesome and welcoming environment for hobbyists of all ages and interests, so using appropriate content tags is important.
       
      • x 1
    7. I think it's because if someone's walking past your desk and just catches a glimpse, they won't realise it's a doll. It just looks like you're looking at nudes and that's not appropriate to do in a work environment.
       
    8. I personally am fully comfortable with nudity, but I think the real factor here is choice. I'd explain the tagging nsfw by saying that seeing naked bodies (even in a non-sexual context) should be something you voluntarily choose, and not something that surprises you or happens without warning. Most people in this hobby have likely seen a resin doll naked, but some may prefer to avoid either really realistic nudity, or sexual content with dolls, and this should be a choice they can make.

      As well, there have been great points made about things one shouldn't be viewing in the workplace, and people who are underage by others in the thread.
       
      • x 1
    9. Well, some of these dolls are pretty realistic and your boss might not see it as artistic but rather think you're looking at some kind of fetish websites at work lol
       
    10. The 'NSFW'-tag I understand, just to avoid awkward situations at your job. In most work-settings it is okay to browse the internet during small breaks and having to explain to your boss that 'really, they are just pictures to show of doll sculpts... no, they're not sexdolls... no really! There's nothing sexual about them!' is not always the most fun thing to do.

      Am I personally offended by doll nudity? I sculpt dolls, so no.
       
    11. Like others have said, I know that if I click a NSFW link on my lunch break, a nude doll at first glance out of my coworker's eye may not be immediately recognizable as a doll. I appreciate the warning before someone not in the hobby glances at my phone and assumes I'm looking at something entirely different (especially since I work in an elementary school). I'm sure you can see how that might be awkward.
       
    12. I have seen people complain about dolls without clothes and even complaining about why so much detail is needed. Generally my sense is that the discomfort is coming from doll collectors who primarily collect other types of dolls and aren't accustom to the detail. Let's face it - many dolls out there are basically mannequins for an outfit or even have cloth bodies and only sculpted hands and feet. The clothing or the face painting is meant to be the star not the body.

      So I can appreciate the NSFW because I think it's a respectful thing to do.
       
    13. This, exactly! At my last job as a secretary, work was very slow in winter, and once my morning paperwork was done, all I did for the rest of the day was answer the phone. In the slow season, that often meant 1-3 calls a day, so I was allowed to play online, just nothing sexual, illegal or gambling. My boss knew I collected dolls and found them interesting, but I think his views might have changed if he walked in on me viewing a very realistic sexy photo with body blushing--especially if the joints were photoshopped out or hidden!

      I'm not the least bit bothered by nudity, but I think of it like tagging gore. It might not bother most people, but in the wrong setting and seen by the wrong people, it could have some bad consequences.
       
    14. If you are clicking links at work or around people who don't get the hobby it could be awkward. My bf has joked with me when my monitor displayed threads or company sites where the body was nude. He's like "you looking at naked girls again?" It's an obvious joke but really, from across the room it can look weird to someone who doesn't collect BJDs :) Better to know what you're getting into when you click that link in mixed company.
       
    15. I posted a pic of one of my dolls on facebook. She was nude and had full fantasy body blushing- nothing over the top, she looks like a little water fairy. And she wasn't posed suggestively at all. I was blasted by a relative for posting 'pornography' and her 12 year old daughter saw it and blah blah blah. I removed her from my facebook contacts. Some people look for things to be offended about.
       
    16. This has actually been discussed before, in substantial detail.

      I do hope this doesn't get as combative as the last round did, because I think that's unnecessary, but in my opinion it's just polite. Everyone's browsing circumstances are different, and I think it's really just courteous to your fellow hobbyist to give them a heads-up that a thread might contain something they may not want someone else to see should they be in a situation where their browsing might not be private.
       
    17. I understand the labeling of doll nudity as NSFW for the purpose of signaling that it might be a bad idea to open the pictures where others and outsiders can see and misunderstand and all.... but people freaking out over seeing naked dolls is not something I can relate to. Especially when they are not even blushed, are no realistic sculpts, and it's something like an unboxing or body review!
      Like, children too. Everyone knows what a human body looks like and these are dolls, not humans, even if they are realistically blushed. Obviously there's a limit when pictures get suggestive or sexual in any way, but a normal, artistic nude, even with realistic blushing is not something I'd personally need a warning for.
      It's ridiculous and exaggerated to me, but that might be my age and upbringing... when I was a kid it was normal to bathe with your parents or run around naked on the beach where strangers could see you and it was not all that drama that nakedness seems to generate nowadays.
       
    18. Before I discovered BJDs, I'd never seen an anatomically correct doll before. That just isn't the "norm" for items that are considered children's playthings. And some of these are correct to almost unnecessary detail, especially when you add in blushing and all that. It can be a bit shocking to the uninitiated, I'm sure. And it's definitely not something you'd want a young child to observe.

      Also, the simple fact is that dolls with parts tend to have a certain stigma attached, and not necessarily a good one. So even if collectors or even some outside observers don't mind, even if it's considered "art", it'd be a little uncomfortable to be browsing pictures of naked dolls in a public area and have the wrong person walk by and get a look. To them, it'd probably be like some guy reading Playboy right out in public. Especially if the dolls are posed in certain ways. So, a warning label I feel is fine and certainly doesn't offend me. Might save me a bit of embarrassing explanation in the long run.

      I remember holding a meet once in a library, and a dad poked his head in and asked if his little girl could look at all the pretty dolls. We said sure ... until we realized one of the boys - a Doll Chateau I believe - was laying there stark nekkid because they owner was in the midst of showing off his joints. I can't tell you how fast that girl scrambled to cover him up before the kid got a good look at him (not quite sure she succeeded in time, either). It was a bit mortifying for everyone around. XD
       
    19. It is a courtesy. Your reader may be bothered by nudity or they may not, but by labeling the post you give them the option to make their own decision.
       
    20. I usually give a warning for the simple reason that the general public isn't necessary familiar with anatomically correct dolls. My mother especially gets confused every time I undress and redress my boys and she happens to walk in. There was one point I was at work looking at dolls on a company site (as long as the phones weren't ringing my boss didn't really care what I did) and my boss happened to look over as a scrolled past the naked body. He asked why I was looking at naked dolls and I just laughed and said I was looking at the joint system. After that, he dropped it and just teased me once in a while, but it was all in good fun.

      Not everyone will take the nudity that way and it's nice to be a little careful.